Case studies – NHS Continuing Healthcare

Case studies – NHS Continuing Healthcare

The criteria that determines who is ‘eligible’ for NHS Continuing Healthcare are open to interpretation by NHS health needs assessors.

This means it can be very difficult to predict who will and won’t be able to access the care funding.

NHS Continuing Healthcare case studies

To help you get an idea of the health needs under consideration in each case, read the health summaries below before clicking through to each case study.

Continuing Care Case No. 1

  • She had advanced Parkinson’s Disease, she’d had three strokes and she had Parkinson’s dementia. She also had heart disease. She could not walk.
  • She was dependent for most things (dressing, washing, eating, drinking, turning in bed, etc) and was physically and mentally frail. She was mostly immobile and had no strength and little coordination of her limbs. She was undernourished and about 6 stone in weight. She slept in a bed with bedrails down each side.
  • She had difficulty speaking and swallowing and was doubly incontinent.
  • She had to be hoisted out of a chair or a bed. She was at severe risk of pressure sores and tissue breakdown. She experienced some involuntary and jerky movements of her limbs, consistent with Parkinson’s Disease. She was excessively sleepy and her eyes were closed most of the time, even if she was awake.
  • Without regular physiotherapy, she would have experienced permanent, chronic and painful contracture of her joints, which would have resulted in her needing even more care.
  • She could sometimes say a few words coherently and acknowledge what was was being said to her. The degree to which she was aware of her environment varied from day to day.

Read about her successful claim for NHS Continuing Healthcare.

Continuing Care Case No. 2

  • He had advanced Parkinson’s Disease and Parkinson’s dementia. Towards the end of his life he had kidney cancer and could also no longer walk. He sometimes experienced hallucinations, which may have been as a result of medication.
  • He was highly dependent for eating, drinking, washing, dressing, turning in bed, etc. Towards the end of his life had to be hoisted in and out of a chair. He could be helped up from a bed without a hoist. He was at risk of pressure sores. He experienced some involuntary and jerky movements of his limbs, consistent with Parkinson’s Disease.
  • He had severe speech difficulties, making verbal expression on his part almost impossible. He could, however, generally understand verbal communication.
  • He was undernourished and was doubly incontinent. Towards the end of his life he had swallowing difficulties.
  • The degree to which he was aware of his environment varied from day to day
  • Because of physical weakness he could not hold himself upright in a chair for very long. He was physically and mentally frail.
  • The cancer left him with extreme fatigue and increasing difficulties with breathing.

Read about his successful claim for NHS Continuing Healthcare.

Read about landmark legal cases for NHS Continuing Healthcare.

Alternatively, read the interview transcript.